Saturday, 24 October 2015 23:42

Slippery Elm

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Slippery Elm

 

 

 

 

Slippery Elm has been around for centuries with many Native American tribes using it to treat wounds and skin irritations. They also believed that Slippery Elm was effective against sore throats and coughs and even gastrointestinal conditions. Settlers from Europe quickly learnt how beneficial Slippery Elm was and was used during the American Civil war to treat open wounds.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Slippery Elm?

 

Slippery Elm is a species of the elm native found in North America. It is a medium sized tree with rough leaves and bright green flowers which come out in March before the leaves appear. The inner bark, which is a pale spongy layer found between the rough outer bark and the wood of mature elm trees is dried and shredded. Only a small amount can be removed at a time of the tree is to remain healthy.

 

Benefits of the Slippery Elm

 

  • When mucilages in slippery elm comes in contact with moisture, it absorbs the water. This causes the mucilage to swell and form a gel which coats skin, wounds and sores. This gel helps soothe irritated or inflamed tissue.

  • Slippery Elm may also be used to help with the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders. These include heartburn, gastritis, stomach ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease.

  • Slippery elm can also be used to treat irritated or inflamed skin as well as help with minor burns and skin wounds including boils and abscesses. It can also be used in the treatment of gout, inflamed joints and toothache.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Side Effects of taking Slippery Elm

 

Touching slippery elm may cause an allergic reaction in people allergic to elms. Applying slippery elm to the skin may cause local burning, itching, rash, redness or scaling.  

 

 

Guidelines to taking Slippery Elm

 

When taking slippery elm products orally, always take it with plenty of water to prevent swelling and possible internal blockage. 

 

Read 1510 times Last modified on Sunday, 25 October 2015 00:12

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